why is my vagina sore after sex

Why Is my Vagina Sore after Sex

It’s natural to have a lot of questions when you’re coping with a why is my vagina sore after sex. If a passionate romp leaves you waddling (let’s be honest, that’s the correct and highly unromantic way to explain it), it’s easy to believe that things just went out of hand. Many people desire rough sex that causes considerable discomfort in some cases. However, your vagina should not hurt after or during intercourse in most cases.

After all, getting intimate with your spouse should be pleasurable. When intercourse is terrible (medically known as dyspareunia), it’s necessary to inform both your partner and your physician. This should not lead you to believe that there is something severely wrong with you or your body. For a variety of causes, the vagina might feel painful during or after intercourse. Pressure, infections, sensitivities, and trauma are all possible reasons.

Treatments differ according to the reason. Counseling may be a helpful alternative if the discomfort is caused by psychological factors, such as psychologically induced vaginal tightness. However, if the pain is caused by a latex allergy, switching condoms may help lessen the ache.

This article explains why a person’s feel why is my vagina sore after sex and what they may do to relieve or avoid the pain.

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Causes Why Your Vagina May Be Hurt After Sex

A painful vaginal region after sexual intercourse can be caused by a variety of causes. Among these causes are:

Lack of lubrication

When you become aroused, your body produces spontaneous lubricant. However, lubrication isn’t always enough. You may encounter a bit more friction than usual if your sexual excitement is low or you hurry into things without allowing yourself time to warm up.

This friction can produce tiny, microscopic rips in the vagina, causing pain and discomfort. It may even cause infection in rare circumstances.

Prolonged or vigorous sex

If sexual intercourse was rough, you may have pain or discomfort in your vagina and surrounding the vulva. Friction and added pressure can irritate delicate tissue.

If you or your partner used your fingers, a sex object, or any other item during sexual intercourse, you may feel some increased discomfort.

Some sex objects or toys may require extra lubrication to decrease friction, depending on the material. If sex objects or toys are not used properly, you may have some pain after sexual activity.

Allergic reaction to condoms, lubricants, or other products

An allergic response to a latex condom, lubricant, or other object brought into the bed may cause discomfort below. It may also cause genital discomfort in the vulva. The discomfort may spread into the canal if something was introduced into the vagina.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

During intercourse, vaginal discomfort may be the initial indication of a STI such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, or genital herpes.
If you haven’t been tested, consider being tested for STIs to rule out infections. If your companion has not been tested, request that they do so. Treatment for both of you is essential to avoid further illnesses.

Yeast infection

One of the most typical signs of a yeast infection is pain after sexual activity in the vulva or vagina. Other symptoms include vaginal irritation, edema, and discomfort when urinating.

Urinary tract infection (UTI)

A UTI can cause more than simply urination pain. It can also cause discomfort in your pelvic and vaginal region.
You may suffer more soreness and inflammation if you have a UTI during sexual intercourse.

Bartholin’s cyst

Bartholin’s glands are located on each side of the vaginal entrance. They give natural vaginal lubrication.
These cysts, or the channels that transport the fluid, can get clogged at times. Tender, fluid-filled lumps appear on one side of the vaginal entrance.Sexual intercourse can irritate Bartholin’s cysts and the surrounding tissue, resulting in unanticipated pain.

Vulvar pain

Both friction and pressure from sexual contact can induce pain in the vulva. If the discomfort occurs before you begin sexual activity, it might be a sign of an underlying illness, such as vulvar ulcers.
Consult a doctor if vulvar discomfort persists for more than a few hours or days. You might be suffering from a more serious condition, such as vulvodynia.

Vulvodynia

Vulvodynia is defined as vulvar discomfort that lasts at least three months. This ailment is not known what causes it, yet it is not rare.
You may have throbbing, burning, or stinging in the vaginal region in addition to discomfort following sexual activity. In severe situations, the sensitivity is so intense that wearing clothing or doing daily duties is practically impossible.

How To Relieve or why is my vagina sore after sex

Some of these diseases can be treated at home. Others may require the assistance of a health professional.

Ice pack

Friction or pressure pain should go away on its own after a few hours. Meanwhile, an ice pack may assist relieve vulvar irritation.Place the ice pack on the affected area for 5 to 10 minutes at a time. Place the ice pack on the vulva with underpants or a washcloth in between. Also, don’t put the cold pack in your vagina.

Antibiotics

Antibiotics can be used to treat infections such as UTIs, PIDs, and certain STIs. Yeast infections can also be treated with over-the-counter medications. However, before self-treating, it is best to seek a diagnosis and suggested therapy from a healthcare expert.

Hormonal treatment

Some people may benefit from hormone replacement treatment. This permits the body to gradually acclimatise to hormonal changes such as those induced by menopause. It may also aid in the restoration of some natural lubrication and the reduction of painful sexual intercouse.

Surgery

If you have a Bartholin’s cyst or uterine fibroids, your doctor may suggest surgery to remove them. Draining may be tried before the gland is removed in the event of a cyst.

Pelvic floor muscle exercise

Reverse Kegels may aid in the relaxation of your pelvic floor muscles. This may not only lessen discomfort after sexual intercourse, but it may also make sexual penetration more delightful from the start.

Therapy

Some vaginal patients may suffer anxiety following painful sexual penetration. This might make it difficult for them to have sexual pleasure or relax during intercourse.
Sex therapy may help individuals overcome and control their anxiety in that instance. Check out the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists (AASECT) database for a list of trained sex therapists in your region.